Sasha A. Barab: Vita

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EDUCATION

B.A., Psychology, American University, Washington, D. C., 1989.
Certification: Special Education Teacher (K-12). State of Connecticut, 1994.
M.A., Education, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 1994.
Ph.D., Cognition and Instruction, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 1997.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

PROFESSOR, May 2011 – present, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. Tenure track position in the College of Education, with affiliation as Senior Scientist Researcher for the Learning Sciences Institute. Responsibilities include research, teaching, and service. Research interests include games for learning, online communities, situativity theory, and design-based research. Also responsible for overseeing a games and impact certificate and degree program, as well as design labs for interdisciplinary agendas. Awarded the Pinnacle West Endowed Chair of Education.

Director, January 2012- present, Center for Games and Impact, Arizona State University, Scottsdale, AZ. The Center has as its core mission to support research, design and the creation of publishing models for ‘double-bottom-line’ computer and video games that address the biggest social, cultural, scientific and economic challenges we face. Specific duties include managing numerous games and impact initiatives, managing a studio of designers, coordinating university agendas, and supporting partnerships with other organizations.

PROFESSOR, August 1997 – 2011, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Tenure track position in the Department of Learning Sciences and Instructional Systems Technology located in the School of Education. Responsibilities include research, teaching, and service. Research interests are building communities of learning and on small group learning in technology-based, student-directed, learning environments using a situativity lens. Typical courses taught include computers and education for undergraduate students, and cognition and instruction courses for graduate students. Also appointed as a core member of the Cognitive Science Program Faculty.

DIRECTOR, August 1999 – 2011, Center for Research on Learning and Technology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The CRLT has as its mission to promote and support a community of scholars dedicated to research and professional development on the design, use, and implementation of technology to improve learning. Specific duties include overseeing the Centers research projects, managing CRLT grants, and coordinating collaborative efforts among faculty and students.

ENDOWED CHAIR, Barbara Jacobs Chair of Technology. Barbara Jacobs Endowment, September 2005-August 2007, $150,000/year. An endowed chair awarded by the School of Education , Indiana University . This is a five year award with the goal of supporting a prestigious faculty in the area of teaching with technology. My particular work involves three overlapping initiatives related to facilitating technological innovation: Discussion and Collaboration among Faculty and Students, Partnerships with the Surrounding Schools and After School Centers, and Impacting National and International Discussions of Technology and Learning .

SENIOR SCIENTIST & GAME DESIGNER, August 2004-2007, One Planet Education Network, Boston, MA. One Planet Education Network (OPEN) is an international e-learning and educational service provider. OPEN fully utilizes multimedia technologies in the K-12 and Higher Education sectors, by providing standards-based multidisciplinary curriculum and content, online 3D Learning environment applications, professional development programs, and other related educational products and services. Responsibilities include developing 3D multi-user virtual worlds, running professional development workshops, and defining academic priorities and curricular frameworks for curriculum development.

SENIOR SCIENTIST OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH, February 2000-present, ActiveInk Network, Austin, TX. The ActiveInk Network is an interactive learning environment for teachers, students, and parents. ActiveInk’s rich, interactive learning resources are available via the World Wide Web for school and home users.. Responsibilities include developing a set of educational commitments that are grounded in research on good teaching and learning, co-designing a technology infrastructure that is consistent with these commitments, supporting the development of curricular units that are also consistent with these commitments, and maintaining a research and development framework for maintaining the high quality of ActiveInk curricular units.

PROJECT EVALUATOR, September 2000-March 2001, STARSTREAMS, Academic Edge, Bloomington, IN. The purpose of this NIMH funded project was to design, develop, and evaluate an interactive online environment to support students in five different fifth-grade students across the nation in developing conflict resolution skills. Duties included media and concept design, data evaluation, and writing up final report.

CONSULTANT, October 1999-present, UNext.com, Chicago, IL. UNext.com is dedicated to making high quality education available anywhere and anytime. The goal of this online, e-commerce company is to create powerful learning communities that marry the world’s most respected academic scholars and institutions with the global reach and interactive capabilities of the Internet. Responsibilities include consulting on a system for the development and evaluation of problem-based learning modules.

PROGRAM EVALUATOR, June 1999-September 1999, School for Continuing Studies at Indiana University. Worked as a faculty fellow in the School for Continuing Studies to establish research agenda based on there course innovations. Duties included meeting with faculty, reviewing courses, establishing research protocol, and writing up a final report.

PROJECT EVALUATOR, November 1997-November 1998, Interactive Multimedia CD-ROM for Social Skills in ADHD, Indiana University. The purpose of this NIMH funded project was to design, develop, and evaluate an integrated media intervention that will foster the development of age appropriate social problem-solving skills by ADHD and other adolescents. Duties included media and concept design, data evaluation, and writing up final report.

PROJECT EVALUATOR, Summer 1997, Scientist’s Apprentice Camp, Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis. Twenty-three middle school students worked in groups of four under the expert guidance of a practicing scientist as they conducted scientific research. They were presented with an authentic research problem and they had hands-on experience with state-of-the-art instrumentation and equipment. Duties included data collection, data analysis and final report.

SUPERVISOR, September 1998-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Responsible for the supervision of pre-service teachers seeking a computer endorsement.

CURRICULUM SPECIALIST, Summer 1995-Summer 1997, Quirk Middle School, Hartford, CT. Worked with 40 middle-school teachers designing, implementing, and evaluating integrated units. Responsible for in-service workshops, assisting in the teaching of the units, and facilitating the diffusion of successes and challenges through out the school and local community.

CURRICULUM CONSULTANT, January 1995-Summer 1997, EastConn School, Chaplin, CT. Assisting teachers and psychologists at an elementary school for exceptional students. Responsibilities include the development and implementation of various units.

TECHNOLOGY COORDINATOR, August 1996-August 1997, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Responsible for the maintaining, networking, and staff development of all computer systems (Macintosh & PC) in the department of nursing. Supervise graduate interns on similar tasks.

BIOSTATISTICIAN, September 1995-January 1997, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Responsible for data analysis and consultation to the School of Nursing.

SUPERVISOR, August 1994-July 1996, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Responsible for the placement and supervision of graduate interns, student teachers, and college junior and senior students at various k-12 schools.

STATISTICAL ANALYST, Summer 1996, Putnam School District, Putnam, CT. Analyzed and wrote a final report on K-12 Connecticut Mastery Test scores as part of a Student Achievement Grant.

STATISTICAL ANALYST, September 1995 – June 1996, Hartford Urban Educational Network, Storrs, CT. Analyzed data on inner-city, middle- and high-school students as part of a national project, “Community Compacts for Student Success,” intended to increase the number of inner-city students who succeed in secondary studies.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPER, June 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Responsible for developing a teacher’s manual to facilitate the teaching of graduate students on using computers for statistical analysis. Funded by the university of Connecticut.

ELEMENTARY TEACHER, Summer-Fall 1994, EastConn School, Chaplin, CT. Taught at an elementary school for exceptional students. Responsibilities included teaching classes and developing Individualized Education Plans.

TECHNOLOGY SUPERVISOR, Summer 1994 & Summer 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Responsible for setting up, debugging, and maintaining technology at CONNSENSE (a technology conference for educators working with students with special needs).

COMPUTER TEACHER, August 1992-June 1994, Bulkeley High School, Hartford, CT. Taught computer classes at an inner-city school. Classes contained students with a wide range of abilities–special education, high risk, English as a Second Language, and mainstream. Classes were designed to teach students computer, mathematics and English skills. Also responsible for installing, configuring, and maintaining various technology.

SCHOOL SERVICES COUNSELOR/PRIMARY COUNSELOR, August 1991- August 1992, Thunder Road Chemical Dependency Center, Oakland, CA. Facilitated support groups for at-risk-youth in high schools. Also responsible for running family groups, giving lectures, and creating treatment plans at an inpatient chemical dependency center.

INSTRUCTOR/COUNSELOR, January-July 1991, School of Urban Wilderness Survival, Shoshone, Idaho. Instructed high-school students in the use of American Indian survival skills as well as on the history, culture, and mythology of the American West.

ENGLISH TEACHER, March-July 1990, Thai Boe Camp, Thailand. Taught English to Burmese refugee students living in Thailand. Activities included designing an English curriculum.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER, September 1989-February 1990, The Mayflower School, Nigeria. Taught physical education to 9-16-year-old Nigerian students. Projects included designing a bamboo obstacle course to promote cooperation, self-confidence, and hand-eye coordination.

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Using a Game-Based Curriculum to Achieve Academic Success. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, December 2010-November 2013, $2,400,000. A three-year grant to understand the challenges and opportunities of using quest-based gaming curriculum in K-12 schools. Includes large-scale comparison studies, national fidelity studies, and a series of in-depth ethnographies of particular locations.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Developing a Commercial Viable (yet Pedagogically Innovative) Gaming Curriculum. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, January 2008-September 2010, $500,000. An eighteen-month grant to explore the commercialization of a game-based learning environment with a disruptive curricular core to multiple classrooms and after-school sites around the world.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Transactive Narratives: An inclusive Game-Based Programming Toolkit. National Science Foundation, September 2009-August 2012, $749,000. (Principal Investigator with E. Klopfer & K. Peppler) A two-year grant about building a narrative programming toolkit for children around the world. Beyond examining narratives about significant issues from an international perspective, the work is focused on supporting learners develop programming fluency in a creative manner.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Scaling Out Virtual Worlds: Growing a 21st Century Curriculum. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, January 2008-September 2010, $1,880,000. A three-year grant about scaling a game-based learning environment with a critical curricular core to multiple classrooms and after-school sites around the world, and researching the opportunities, challenges, and impact of scaling such an innovative curriculum.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Academic Play Spaces: Learning for the 21st Century. MacArthur Foundation, December 2006-December 2008, $500,000. An 18 month Macarthur grant to advance theoretical and practical knowledge with respect to the design of engaging technology-rich, gaming contexts for supporting the development of knowledgeable, responsible, and caring young adults.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, A Socially-Responsive Meta-Game For Learning. National Science Foundation-ROLE, September 2004-August 2007, $1,520,000. A three year NSF grant to undertake a series of naturalistic studies and experimental manipulations that will advance theoretical and practical knowledge with respect to the design of engaging technology-rich, gaming contexts for supporting science learning and engaged citizenship.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, Designing Communities of Practice to Support Math, Science, Technology, & Pedagogy Learning. National Science Foundation-CAREER, September 2001-August 2006, $632,047. A five year NSF grant to obtain an empirically grounded understanding of the potentials and challenges of designing for communities to support learning in math, science, and technology. This has specifically involved the research and development of the Quest Atlantis project.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, September 1999-August 2002, The Inquiry Learning Forum: Fostering and Sustaining Knowledge Networking to Support a Community of Science and Mathematics Teachers. A three-year NSF-KDI grant to design and evaluate the salient features of an electronic knowledge network, the Internet Learning Forum (ILF), to support a virtual community of pre-service and in-service mathematics and science teachers, allowing them to share and improve pedagogical practices.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, September 99-June 00, Building Connections Through Virtual Worlds. Investigating the use of web-based technologies to develop and make available a set of professional development supports for teachers and curricular supports for students, which will allow middle school students distributed in classrooms across the state to learn astronomy in a project-based, technology-rich learning environment. Serving as Principal Investigator.

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR, July 1997-September 1999, Virtual Solar System Project. The virtual reality solar system project is a curriculum/research project intended to design and evaluate a technology-rich, project-based course for teaching astronomy to undergraduate students. Duties included collaborating on the course conception, design, and evaluation. Also assembled a research team to investigate various issues related to learning. Served as PI or Co-PI on grants in support of this project.

PROJECT RESEARCHER, Summer 1997, Future Park, Indiana University/Purdue University Indianapolis. Future Camp 97 supported high school students in using state-of-the-art technology for exploration, discovery, and invention. Students worked in groups of 6 to design either a Virtual Solar System, a Virtual Theater, or a virtual tour of the Indiana State House. Duties included data collection, data analysis and reporting findings.

PROJECT MANAGER, July 1995-January 1997, Learning with Generative Hypertext, The Spencer Foundation and University of Connecticut. The project is intended to examine the use of three different computerized environments on middle-school students’ reading comprehension. Duties included writing the initial grant proposal, programming software, implementing project timeline, data collection, data analysis and reporting findings. Manuscripts related to this research are currently under review.

GRADUATE ASSISTANT, September 1995-August 1996, Partners in Exploring Science Grant, The National Science Foundation through Project CONNSTRUCT and University of Connecticut. This project was designed to provide a window from which primary and secondary students can observe and ask questions of graduate-level physics students carrying out scientific research. Duties included writing scripts for videos to be shown on cable television, teacher training, and facilitating the use of a two-way interactive voice, video, and data system between the university and the participating primary and secondary schools.

COMPUTER PROGRAMMER, January 1995-August 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Developed a computer-based hypermedia program containing approximately 80 megabytes of information, including 21 single-spaced pages of textual information, 45 digitized images, 15 digitized videos, and 7 animated videos. This lesson on viruses and the rain forest enabled students to explore the subject matter in a self-determined, nonlinear fashion. My dissertation and one first author publication have resulted from this work.

GRADUATE ASSISTANT, September 1993-August 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Collected, analyzed and summarized data on inner-city middle and high-school students involved in a computer-writing program. Responsible for the preparation of technical reports to the funding agency.

CURRICULUM DEVELOPER, September 1993-May 1994, Bulkeley High School, Hartford, CT. Responsible for designing, evaluating, and programming software to be used with English as a Second Language students to facilitate the learning of English vocabulary and syntax.

UNIVERSITY TEACHING

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2012, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ. Games & learning. In this course, we will explore the power of games for education. We will play games, read about games, theorize about games, and even create games. This course will be both practical and theoretical, pushing students to critically examine game play, claims and theories related to game play, and then exploring the implications for game and education design. Consistent with my other graduate seminars, class activities will include a mixture of group work, class discussions, Socratic dialogues, lectures, readings, essays, and hands-on activities. Readings will range from philosopher Hans Gadamer to games scholar Henry Jenkins to game designer Richard Bartle. And, yes, you will be required to play games, ranging from Zelda on a Nintendo DS to Rock Band on a platform to World of Warcraft on a PC.

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2010, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Games & Impact. In this course, we will explore the power of games for education. We will play games, read about games, theorize about games, and even create games. This course will be both practical and theoretical, pushing students to critically examine game play, claims and theories related to game play, and then exploring the implications for game and education design. Class activities will include a mixture of group work, class discussions, Socratic dialogues, lectures, readings, essays, and hands-on activities. Readings will range from philosopher Hans Gadamer to games scholar Henry Jenkins to game designer Richard Bartle. And, yes, you will be required to play games, ranging from Zelda on a Nintendo DS to Rock Band on a platform to World of Warcraft on a PC.

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2007, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Intro to Learning Sciences. The focus of this course is to help students develop a rich appreciation for the relationship between theoretical assumptions and practical convictions, especially as they relate to theories of learning and development. Learning Sciences is an interdisciplinary field that draws on multiple theoretical perspectives and research paradigms from the human sciences so as to understand the nature and conditions of learning, cognition, development, and related areas of human performance. Learning scientists investigate cognition in its material, social, and cultural context but with the broad goal of conducting both laboratory-based and naturalistic investigations. This course will introduce theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, and practical applications as they relate to the learning scientist.

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2006, Indiana University, Bloomington , IN. Learning and Cognition. In an attempt to bring together narrative and disciplinary formalisms, this graduate class was designed as a game-based learning environment. Assignments and class participation were contextualized within an interactive narrative about a society that was creating formal learning institutions for the first time. Students had to use various texts about learning theory and other resources created for the class to complete five challenges or missions situated in a 3D virtual learning environment. These missions were designed to be educational, meaningful, and entertaining. They were designed to establish a context such that students can appreciate the value of course content, and gain experience in applying the theories in meaningful ways.

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2005, Indiana University , Bloomington , IN. Theory and Method in the Learning Sciences. The focus of this course is to help students develop a rich appreciation for the relationship between theoretical assumptions and practical convictions, especially as they relate to theories of learning and development. Learning Sciences is an interdisciplinary field that draws on multiple theoretical perspectives and research paradigms from the human sciences. Researchers in the Learning Sciences attempt to understand the nature and conditions of learning, cognition, development, and related areas of human performance. In this course we examine the history of cognitive science, different philosophical claims that are central to the Learning Sciences, as well as seminal articles and core controversies to the field.

INSTRUCTOR, Spring 2001-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Building Online Communities. For the most part the wealth of research on designing communities has not focused on designing for online communities in the service of learning. This course examined what we do and do not know about the processes and practices of designing communities to support learning. Some of the central questions to be addressed include: What constitutes community? How do these electronic environments relate to more familiar place-based pedagogical ones? How well do the techniques and constructs that are used to understand the processes of learning and enculturation in traditional face-to-face community settings suffice for these new settings? What is the educational value of a community approach to learning?

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 2000-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Computer Endorsement Cohort. The Computer Endorsement Cohort (CEC) is designed to prepare teachers at all grade levels to use the knowledge and skills of pedagogy and technology to enhance teaching and learning. The program is highly personalized, heavily field-based, and intended to provide a supportive community through which pre-service teachers can become skillful in integrating technology to support learning and teaching. Students achieve a computer endorsement by collecting evidence that they, indeed, can teach in the 23 ways described in CEC’s Program Expectations.

INSTRUCTOR, Spring 2000-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Methods for Capturing Cognition in Situ. For the most part situative theories have been developed and researched through anthropological studies, frequently with a focus on activity that takes place in contexts of daily living and working. These methods and their emphasis on the “context” of socially situated activity as opposed to cognition and learning, only provide general research frameworks and theories for examining learning in intentional learning environments. The goal of this course it to review and explore the development of specific methodologies for capturing cognition and learning as they emerge within the context of learning environments.

INSTRUCTOR, Spring 1999-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Development of Situated Learning Environments. This course is designed to review and analyze in detail theories and research on situated cognition. Consistent with the theory, discussion will be “situated” in a realistic project designed to apply the concepts of the theory to instruction through technology. Upon completion of this course students should have acquired knowledge on two fronts, the content domain of situated cognition research and its application to real learning problems. Students will be expected to undertake a situated cognition design project and to construct a research proposal that will test the theory in the context of this project.

INSTRUCTOR, Spring 1999, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Evaluation and Change in the Instructional Development Process. Evaluation and change are two integral elements of the instructional and performance technology processes. The course is divided into two units to reflect these two elements. The course is project-based and hands-on, with students being expected to develop a complete evaluation of and change management plan on a project occurring in a K-12 or corporate setting. The goal of this course it to provide students with a collaborative experience of doing evaluation and change management as part of a team.

INSTRUCTOR, Spring 1998-present, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Computer-Based Teaching Methods. This hands-on class is designed to introduce pre-service education students to advanced uses of computers in education. Specifically, developing skills related to: integrating educational technology into the school curriculum, engaging in professional development activities involving technology in K-12 schools; writing grants to acquire technology for the classroom; and appreciating principles of software design and evaluation.

INSTRUCTOR, Fall 1997, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Educational Uses of Technology. This course is designed to introduce teacher certification students to potential uses of computers in education. The hands-on class involves supporting students as they build shared meanings, mindsets, and become skillful in practices related to classroom use of technology.
INSTRUCTOR, Summer 1997, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Methods and Techniques of Educational Research. Responsible for instructing graduate students on the fundamentals of educational research. An emphasis on connecting theory, methods, and analysis using a quantitative approach.
INSTRUCTOR, Summer 1995, Summer 1996, Fall 1996, & Spring 1997, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Computer Methods in Educational Research. Responsible for instructing graduate students on the fundamentals of computer analysis of educational research. An emphasis on learning SPSS with the University’s mainframe system and on the personal computer.
LECTURER, Fall 1996, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Instrument Development. Instructed graduate students on the principals and uses of structural equation modeling.
INSTRUCTOR, Fall 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Educational Psychology. Instructed 27 undergraduate students on psychological research as applied to teaching, learning, and instructional contexts.
LECTURER, Fall 1994, 1995, 1996, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Methods of Inquiry for Educational Professionals. Instructed graduate students on how to use computers for statistical analysis.
INSTRUCTOR, Fall 1994 & Fall 1995, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT. Technology in Education. This hands-on class was designed to introduce teacher certification students to potential uses of computers in education.
SERVICE ACTIVITIES

DIRECTOR, August 1999 – present, Center for Research on Learning and Technology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. The CRLT has as its mission to promote and support a community of scholars dedicated to research and professional development on the design, use, and implementation of technology to improve learning. Specific duties include overseeing the Center’s research projects, managing CRLT grants, and coordinating collaborative efforts among faculty and students.
VOLUNTEER, August 2001 – present, Boys & Girls Club, Bloomington, IN. The Boys and Girls Club of Bloomington is a part of national guidance organization which fosters the physical, intellectual, emotional and social growth of boys and girls ages six to eighteen with a special concern for those most in need of service. It serves on average 100 students a day. Specific duties include establishing a program for, and organizing volunteers to work in, the computer laboratory.
CRITICAL FRIEND, January 2000 – present, Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN. the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis serves over 1.2 million visitors annually, including thousands of inner-city children each month. It actively works to involve children in the planning, development and design of museum programs and exhibits-to truly be a museum of and with children as well as for children. Duties include offering critical feedback on museum activities as well as supporting the development of various university-museum collaborations.
CURRICULUM CONSULTANT, January 2001-present, Lafayette School District, Lafayette, IN. Worked with middle- and high-school mathematics teachers to develop inquiry-based lessons that integrated technology. Responsible for in-service workshops, assisting in the teaching of the units, and facilitating the sharing of lessons and activities.
COMMITTEE MEMBER, September 1998-present, Research & Development Awards Committee, Bloomington, IN. Committee focused on reviewing PROFFITT grant submissions and distributing funds to School of Education Faculty. Duties include reading 20-25 grants per year, and attending meetings to determine how to distribute funds.
COMMITTEE MEMBER, September 1998-present, Kemp and Larson Awards Committee, Bloomington, IN. Committee focused on reviewing Kemp and Larsen grant submissions and distributing funds to Instructional Systems Technology faculty and graduate students. Duties include reading 20-25 grants per year, and determining how to distribute funds. Also created a Website for the project.
STUDENT-TEACHER SUPERVISOR, September 1998-present, Computer Endorsement Program, Bloomington, IN. Responsible for the placement and supervision of student teachers at local k-12 schools. Also responsible for writing up reflections after observing teaching.
EXPERT WITNESS, June 2001, Web-Based Education Commission; Atlanta, GA. Special commission developed by President Clinton to investigate the potential of the Internet to support learning, and to direct the next year of congressional spending priorities. I presented an official testimony to congress as part of a 12 person panel..
ASSOCIATE EDITOR, February 2001-present, The Journal of the Learning Sciences; Erlbaum. As Special Issues Editor I have the responsibility of putting together special issues, including selecting interesting topics, assembling reviewers, and making final editorial decisions regarding which articles are accepted and need further revision.
PANEL REVIEW MEMBER, November 2001-present, National Science Foundation; Arlington, VA. I have participated as part of multiple NSF panels to review NSF grants. Responsibilities included reviewing grants and then meeting in VA as part of a panel to determine funding priorities.
JOURNAL REVIEWER, September 1997-present, Journal of Research on Science Teaching; The Journal of the Learning Sciences; Educational Technology Research & Development; Instructional Science; Mind, Culture & Activity.
EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBER, September 2000 – present, Journal of Research on Science Teaching; The Journal of the Learning Sciences; Educational Technology Research & Development;
GUEST LECTURER, August 1999, Peace Conference, Bloomington, IN. Responsible for facilitating a hands-on workshop on Peace and the Internet.
MISCELLANEOUS

FULBRIGHT SENIOR SCIENTIST AWARDA Fulbright Award to travel to Australia and study aboriginal storytelling, and the work with families to develop game-based versions. Also, to study the integration of my technology designs in schools around Australia.
CILT SYNERGY AWARD, April 2000. Award granted from the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies to a researcher who has made a substantial contribution to the community.
ACTIVE LEARNING AWARD, September 1999. Award for revising undergraduate of teacher education course.
AECT IMMERSIVE LEARNING AWARD, August 2010. An award given by the American Educational Technology Conference committee to the developer of an innovative technology that is transforming learning and teaching in applied.
CILT SYNERGY AWARD, April 2000. Award granted from the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies to a researcher who has made a substantial contribution to the community.
ACTIVE LEARNING AWARD, September 1999. Award for revising undergraduate of teacher education course.
BARBARA JACOBS CHAIR OF TECHNOLOGY, September 2007. An endowed chair awarded by the School of Education , Indiana University . This is a five year award with the goal of supporting a prestigious faculty in the area of teaching with technology.
CILT SYNERGY AWARD, April 2000. Award granted from the Center for Innovative Learning Technologies to a researcher who has made a substantial contribution to the community.
ACTIVE LEARNING AWARD, September 1999. Award for revising undergraduate of teacher education course.
TERA AWARD, May 1998. Award given to facilitate teaching excellence in areas involving distance technologies.
HARRIS KAHN DISSERTATION AWARD, April 1998. Award given to the best dissertation in the School of Education at the University of Connecticut.
J. RAYMOND AND AUGUSTA H. GERBERICH FELLOWSHIP, June 1996. Fellowship given to an outstanding researcher at the University of Connecticut.
GRANTS

Pedagogy for the 21st Century: Scaling Out a Game-Based Curriculum. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, November 2010-October 2013, $2,500,000. (Principal Investigator with M. Gresalfi)
Developing a Commercial Viable (yet Pedagogically Innovative) Gaming Curriculum. MacArthur Foundation, July 2010-December 2011, $500,000. (Principal Investigator with M. Gresalfi)
Transactive Narratives: An inclusive Game-Based Programming Toolkit. National Science Foundation, September 2009-August 2012, $749,000. (Principal Investigator with E. Klopfer & K. Peppler)
Scaling out Virtual Worlds: Growing a 21st Century Curriculum. MacArthur Foundation, December 2008- December 2011, $1,890,000. (Principal Investigator with M. Gresalfi)
Digital Earth Explorations Project. Department of Education, June 2008-June 2010, $850,000. (Co-Principal Investigator with G. Newman)
Academic Play Spaces: Learning for the 21st Century. MacArthur Foundation, December 2006-December 2008, $500,000. (Principal Investigator with D. Thomas, & Co-PI L. Sheldon)
A Socially-Responsive Meta-Game For Learning. National Science Foundation-ROLE, September 2004-August 2007, $1,520,000. (Principal Investigator, with Co-PI S. Herring, W. Blanton, D. Hickey)
Project 3D-NJ: Building Connections that Matter. NASA, December 2006-December 2007, $423,137. (Principal Investigator)
North Carolina Technology Education Program. Food Lion, December 2006-December 2007, $163,810. (Principal Investigator)
Cognitive Science: New Frontiers in the Interdisciplinary Study of Mind, Learning and Intelligence. Indiana University-CTE, September 2003-August 2008, $2.4 M. base budget, $1.0 M. one time. (Principal Investigator, T. Duffy, with Co-PI S. Barab, A. Clark, R. Shiffrin, M. Siegel, L. Smith )
The Quest Atlantis Project: Developing a Socially-Responsive MetaGame for Learning. National Science Foundation-ROLE, September 2004-August 2007, $1,522,000. (Principal Investigator)
The Quest Atlantis Project: Building an Online MetaGame to Support Learning. National Science Foundation-SGER, March 2001-December 2002, $88,000. (Principal Investigator)
Designing Communities of Practice to Support Math, Science, Technology, & Pedagogy Learning. National Science Foundation-CAREER, September 2001-August 2006, $632,047. (Principal Investigator)
Young Scientist Research Group: Developing a Networked Improvement Community for the Learning Sciences. Center for Innovative Learning Technologies. Dec 2000-June 2001, $10,000. (Principal Investigator, with Co-PI J. Gray).
The Internet Learning Forum: Fostering and Sustaining Knowledge Networking to Support a Community of Science and Mathematics Teachers. National Science Foundation-Knowledge Distributed Intelligence, September 99-August 02, $1,473,303. (Principal Investigator, with Co-PIs R. Kling, T. Duffy, D. Cunningham, & C. Brown)
The Quest Atlantis Project: Creating a Sustainable Coalition of Networked Learning Communities. Indiana University, PROFFITT grant. Dec 2000-Dec 2001, $15,000. (Principal Investigator).
Online Collaborative Tools for K-12 Teachers and Students: Building Inquiry-Based Communities of Practice. ActiveInk Interactive Network, May 00-Sept 01, $50,000. (Principal Investigator)
Building Connections Through Virtual Worlds. Indiana University-Informational Communications High Performance Network Applications Fund, September 99-June 00, $20,000. (Principal Investigator)
Strengthening An Infrastructure In Support Of Research On The Linkage Of Learning Theory, Pedagogy, And Technology. Indiana University-RUGS Research & Equipment Fund, August 1998-August 1999, $50,000. (Principal Investigator, with CO-PIs T. Duffy, C. Bonk, D. Cunningham, & T. Keating)
Digital Weather Station Project. Center for Innovative Learning Technologies-Seed Grant, June 1998-June 1999, $8,000. (CO-Principal Investigator with K. Hay).
Center for Research on Learning and Technology. Indiana University-School of Education, August 1998-August 2000, $140,000. (CO-Principal Investigator with T. Duffy, D. Cunningham, C. Bonk, T. Keating, & T. Frick)
Virtual Reality Solar System Project. Center for Innovative Learning Technologies-Seed Grant, May 1998-June 1999, $7,500. (CO-Principal Investigator with K. Hay)
Building Worlds: Tools for Interdisciplinary, Virtual Practice. Indiana University-InterCampus Research Fund, June 1998-Dec 1998, $7,500. (CO-Principal Investigator with K. Hay)
Professional Development in the 21st Century. Indiana University-Continuing Studies, June 1998-December 1998, $4,650. (Principal Investigator)
Constructing Knowledge and Virtual Worlds,. Indiana University-Proffitt Educational Research Fund, December 1997-December 1998, $11,980. (CO-Principal Investigator with K. Hay)
Learning with Generative Hypertext. Spencer Foundation-Small Grants Program, July 1995-January 1997, $11, 950. (Co-Principal Investigator with M. Young)
PUBLICATIONS

JOURNAL PUBLICATIONS
Barab, S.A., Pettyjohn, P., Gresalfi, M., Volk, C., & Solomou, M. (2012). Game-based curriculum and transformational play: Designing to meaningfully position person, content, and context. Computers & Education 58(3): 518–533.
Gresalfi, M., & Barab, S. A. (2011). Learning for a reason: Supporting forms of engagement by designing tasks and orchestrating environments. Theory into Practice 50(4), 300-310.
Siyahhan, S., Barab, S. & James, C. (2011). Ethics of identity play in virtual spaces. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 22(1), 111-138.
Barab, S.A., Gresalfi, M.S., & Ingram-Goble, A. (2010). Transformational play: Using games to position person, content, and context. Educational Researcher, 39(7), 525-536.
Barab, S.A., Dodge, T., Ingram-Goble, A., Peppler, K., Pettyjohn, P., Volk, C.,& Solomou, M. (2010). Pedagogical dramas and transformational play: Narratively-rich games for learning. Mind, Culture, and Activity 17(3): 235–264.
Barab, S.A., Gresalfi, M.S., Dodge, T., & Ingram-Goble, A. (2010). Narratizing Disciplines and Disciplinizing Narratives: Games as 21st Century Curriculum. International Journal for Gaming and Computer-Mediated Simulations, 2(1). 17-30.
Warren, S., Stein, R. A., Dondlinger, M. J., & Barab, S. A. (2009). A look inside a MUVE design process: Blending instructional design and game principles to target writing skills. Journal of Educational Computing Research,40(3), 295-321.
Thomas, M., K., Barab, S. A., & Tuzun, H. (2009). Developing critical implementations of technology-rich innovations: A cross-case study of the implementation of Quest Atlantis. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 41(2), 125-153.
Dede, C. & Barab, S. A. (2009). Emerging technologies for learning science: A Time of rapid advances. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(4), 301-304.
Barab, S. A., Scott, B., Siyahhan, S. Goldstone, R., Ingram-Goble, A., Zuiker, S., & Warren, S. (2009). Conceptual play as a curricular scaffold: Using videogames to support science education. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(1), 305-320.
Barab, S. A., Gresalfi, M., & Arici, A. (2009). Why educators should care about games. Educational Leadership 67(1), pp. 76-80..
Barab, S. A.,, Gresalfi, M., Ingram-Goble, A., Jameson, E., Hickey, D., Akram, S., & Kizer, S. (2009). Transformational play and Virtual worlds: Worked examples from the Quest Atlantis project. International Journal of Learning and Media, 1(2), URL: http://ijlm.net/knowinganddoing/10.1162/ijlm.2009.0023.
Gresalfi, M., Barab, S. A., Siyahhan, S., & Christensen, T. (2009). Virtual worlds, conceptual understanding, and me: Designing for consequential engagement. On the Horizon, 17(1), 21-34.
Dodge, T., Barab, S., Stuckey, B., Warren, S., Heiselt, C., & Stein, R. (2008). Children’s sense of self: Learning and meaning in the digital age. Journal of Interactive Learning Research 19(2), 225–249.
Barab, S. A., Zuiker, S., Warren, S., Hickey, D., Ingram-Goble, A., Kwon, E-J., Kouper, I., & Herring, S. C. (2007). Situationally Embodied Curriculum: Relating Formalisms and Contexts. Science Education, 91(5), 750-782.
Barab, S. A., Dodge, T., Thomas, M, Jackson, C., & Tuzun, H. (2007). Our Designs and the Social Agendas They Carry. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 16(2), 263-305.
Barab, S. A., Sadler, T., Heiselt, C., Hickey, D., Zuiker, S. (2007). Relating Narrative, Inquiry, and Inscriptions: A Framework for Socio-Scientific Inquiry. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 59-82.
Barab, S, A., & Dede, C. (2007). Games and immersive participatory simulations for science education: An emerging type of curricula. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 1-3.
Goldsworthy, R., Schwartz, N., Barab, S., & Landa, A. (2007). Evaluation of a collaborative multimedia conflict resolution curriculum. Educational Technology Research and Development, 55(6), 597-625.
Barab, S., Ritchie, S. M., Hwang, S-W., & Roth, W-M. (2006). Toward a non- reductionist perspective of thinking in science. Cultural Studies of Science Education, 1(3), 451-465.
Barab, S. A. & Jackson, C. (2006). From Plato’s Republic to Quest Atlantis: The role of the philosopher-King. Technology, Humanities, Education, and Narrative, 2(Winter), 22-53.
Barab, S. A. (2006). Context in science education. American Journal of Psychology, 119(4), 5-15.
Barab, S. A. & S., Roth, W.-M. (2006). Intentionally-Bound Systems and Curricular-Based Ecosystems: An Ecological Perspective on Knowing. Educational Researcher, 35(5), 3-13.
MaKinster, J. G., Barab, S. A., Harwood, W. S., Andersen, H. O. (2006). The effect of social context on the reflective practice of pre-service science teachers: Incorporating a web-supported community of teachers. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 14 (3), 543-579.
Baek, E.-O., & Barab, S. A. (2005). A Study of Dynamic Design Dualities in a Web-Supported Community of Practice for Teachers. Educational Technology & Society, 8 (4), 161-177.
Barab, S. A., Thomas, M, Dodge, Carteaux, R., and Tuzun, H. (2005). Making learning fun: Quest Atlantis, a game without guns. Educational Technology Research and Development53(1), 86-108.
Barab, S. A., Arici, A., Jackson, C. (2005). Eat your vegetables and do your homework: A design-based investigation of enjoyment and meaning in learning. Educational Technology 65(1), 15-21.
Barab, S, A., Thomas, M, Dodge, Squire, K., & Newell, M. (2004). Critical design ethnography: Designing for change . Anthropology & Education Quarterly,35 (2), 254-268.
Barab, S. A., Schatz, S., Scheckler, R. (2004). Using Activity Theory to conceptualize online community and using online community to conceptualize Activity Theory. Mind, Culture, & Activity, 11 (1), 25-47.
Barab, S. A. (2004). Using design to advance learning theory, or using learning theory to advance design. Educational Technology, 3, 16-20.
Barab, S. A. & Squire, K. D. (2004). Design-Based Research: Putting Our Stake in the Ground. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 13 (1), 1–14.
Barab, S. A., MaKinster, J., & Scheckler, R. (2003). Designing system dualities: Characterizing a web-supported teacher professional development community. Information Society 19 (3), 237-256.
Barab, S. A. (2003). Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning. Information Society 19 (3), 1-7.
Barab, S. A., & Luehmann, A. L. (2003). Building sustainable science curriculum: Acknowledging and accommodating local adaptation. Science Education, 87 (4), 454–467.
Squire, K., MaKinster, J., Barnett, M., Luehmann, A., & Barab, S. A. (2003). Designed curriculum and local culture: Acknowledging the primacy of classroom culture. Science Education, 87 (4), 468–489.
Herring, S. C., Job-Sluder, K., Scheckler, R., and Barab, S. (2002). Searching for safety online: Managing “trolling” in a feminist forum. The Information Society 18 (5): 371-383.
Barab, S. A., & Plucker, J. A. (2002). Smart people or smart contexts? Cognition, ability, and talent development in an age of situated approaches to knowing and learning. Educational Psychologist, 37 (3), 165-182.
Barab, S. A., Barnett, M. G., & Squire, K. (2002). Building a community of teachers: Navigating the essential tensions in practice. The Journal of The Learning Sciences, 11 (4), 489-542.
Barab, S., A., Barnett, M., Yamagata-Lynch, L., Squire, K., & Keating, T. (2002). Using activity theory to understand the contradictions characterizing a technology-rich introductory astronomy course. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 9 (2), 76-107.
Scheckler, R. K. and Barab, S. (2002). Review of Online Communities: Commerce, Community Action, and the Virtual University , edited by C. Werry and M. Mowbray. The Information Society 18 (4) 303-306.
Moore, J. E., & Barab, S. A., (2002). The Inquiry Learning Forum: A Community of Practice Approach to Online Professional Development. Technology Trends, 46 (3), 44-49.
Barab, S., Thomas, M., Dodge, T., Goodrich, T., Carteaux, B., Tuzun, H. (2002). Empowerment design work: Building participant structures that transform. In P. Bell, R. Stevens, & T. Satwicz (Eds.), Keeping Learning Complex: The Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS) (pp.132-138). Mahwah , NJ : Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Barab, S., MaKinster, J. G., Moore, J., Cunningham, D., & the ILF Design Team. (2001). Designing and building an online community: The struggle to support sociability in the Inquiry Learning Forum. Educational Technology Research and Development, 49 (4), 71-96 .
Barab, S. A., & Luehmann, A. L. (2003). Building sustainable science curriculum: Acknowledging and accommodating local adaptation. Science Education, 87(4), 454467.
Squire, K., MaKinster, J., Barnett, M., Luehmann, A., & Barab, S. A. (2003). Designed curriculum and local culture: Acknowledging the primacy of classroom culture. Science Education, 87(4), 468489.
Barab, S. A., & Plucker, J. A. (2002). Smart people or smart contexts? Cognition, ability, and talent development in an age of situated approaches to knowing and learning. Educational Psychologist, 37(3), 165-182.
Barab, S. A., Barnett, M. G., & Squire, K. (2002). Building a community of teachers: Navigating the essential tensions in practice. The Journal of The Learning Sciences, 11(4), 489-542.
Barab, S., A., Barnett, M., Yamagata-Lynch, L., Squire, K., & Keating, T. (2002). Using activity theory to understand the contradictions characterizing a technology-rich introductory astronomy course. Mind, Culture, and Activity, 9(2), 76-107.
Herring, S., Sluder, K., Scheckler, R., and Barab, S. 2002. Searching for Safety Online: Managing Trolling on a Feminist Bulletin Board. The Information Society 18(5) 371-384.
Scheckler, R. K. and Barab, S. (2002). Review of Online Communities: Commerce, Community Action, and the Virtual University, edited by C. Werry and M. Mowbray. The Information Society 18(4) 303-306.
Moore, J. E., & Barab, S. A., (2002). The Inquiry Learning Forum: A Community of Practice Approach to Online Professional Development. Technology Trends, 46(3), 44-49.
Barab, S., Thomas, M., Dodge, T., Goodrich, T., Carteaux, B., Tuzun, H. (2002). Empowerment design work: Building participant structures that transform. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences, Seattle, WA, 232-236.
Barab, S., MaKinster, J. G., Moore, J., Cunningham, D., & the ILF Design Team. (2001). Designing and building an online community: The struggle to support sociability in the Inquiry Learning Forum. Educational Technology Research and Development, 49(4), 71-96.
Hay, K. E., & Barab, S. A., (2001). Constructivism in practice: A comparison and contrast between apprenticeship and constructionist learning environments. The Journal of the Learning Sciences, 10(3), 281-322.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., Barnett, M. G., & Squire, K. (2001). Constructing virtual worlds: Tracing the historical development of learner practices/understandings. Cognition and Instruction, 19(1), 47-94.
Barab, S. A., & Kirshner, D. (2001). Methodologies for capturing learner practices occurring as part of dynamic learning environments. The Journal of The Learning Sciences, 10(1&2), 5-15.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., Yamagata-Lynch, L. C. (2001). Constructing networks of activity: An in-situ research methodology. The Journal of The Learning Sciences, 10(1&2), 63-112.
Reynolds, E., Treahy, D., Chao, C-C., & Barab, S. A. (2001). The Internet Learning Forum: Developing a community prototype for teachers of the 21st century. Computers in the Schools, 3(4), 107-126.
Barab, S. A., Thomas, M. K., & Merrill, H. (2001). Online learning: From information dissemination to fostering collaboration. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 12(1), 105-143.
Barnett, M., Barab, S. A., & Hay, K. E. (2001). The virtual solar system project: Student modeling of the solar system. The Journal of College Science Teaching, 30(5), 300-304.
MaKinster, J. G., Barab, S. A., & Keating, T. M. (2001) Design and implementation of an on-line professional development community: A project-based learning approach. Electronic Journal of Science Education, 5(3): Available at: http://unr.edu/homepage/crowther/ejse/ejsev5n3.html
Talbot, R. M., MaKinster, J. G., Moore, J., & Barab, S. (2001). The Inquiry Learning Forum: Visiting classrooms and building community. The Hoosier Science Teacher, 26(3), 83-88.
Barab, S. A., & Hay, K. (2001). Doing science at the elbows of scientists: Issues related to the scientist apprentice camp. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 38(1), 70-102.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., Barnett, M. G., & Keating, T. (2000). Virtual solar system project: Building understanding through model building. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 37(7), 719-756.
Barab, S. A., Squire, K., & Dueber, B. (2000). Supporting authenticity through participatory learning. Educational Technology Research and Development, 48(2), 37-62. Goldsworthy, R., Barab, S. A., Goldsworthy, E. (2000). The STAR project: Enhancing adolescents social understanding. Journal of Special Education Technology, 15(2), 13-26.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., Squire, K., Barnett, M., Schmidt, R., Karrigan, K., Yamagata-Lynch, L., & Johnson, C. (2000). Virtual solar system project: Learning through a technology-rich, inquiry-based, participatory learning environment. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 9(1), 7-25.
DAvanzo, C. & Barab, S. (2000). Drinking during pregnancy: Practices of Cambodian refugees in France and the United States. Health Care for Women International, 21, (4), 319-334.
Barab, S. A., Cherkes-Julkowski, M., Swenson, R., Garrett. S., Shaw, R. E., & Young, M. (1999). Principles of self-organization: Ecologizing the learner-facilitator system. The Journal of The Learning Sciences, 8(3&4), 349-390.
Barab, S. A. (1999). Ecologizing instruction through integrated Units. Middle School Journal, 30, 21-28.
Barab, S. A., Young, M. F., & Wang, J. (1999). The effects of navigational and generative activities in hypertext learning on problem solving and comprehension. International Journal of Instructional Media, 26(3), 1-27.
Young, M. F., & Barab, S. (1999). Perception of the raison d’etre in anchored instruction: An ecological psychology perspective. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 20(2), 113-135.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K., & Duffy, T. (1998). Grounded Constructions and How Technology Can Help. Technology Trends,43(2), 15-23.
Barab, S. A., Redman, B. K., & Froman, R. (1998). Measurement Characteristics of the Levels of Institutionalization Scale: Examining its Reliability and Validity. Journal of Nursing Measurement, 6(1), 1-15.
DAvanzo, C. & Barab, S. (1998). Depression and anxiety among Cambodian refugee women in France and the United States. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 19, 1-16.
Barab, S. A., & Landa, A. (1997). Designing effective interdisciplinary anchors. Educational Leadership, 54(6), 52-55.
Barab, S. A., Bowdish, B. E., & Lawless, K. A. (1997). Hypermedia navigation: Profiles of hypermedia users. Educational Technology Research and Development, 45(3), 23-42.
Young, M. F., Kulikowich, J. M., & Barab, S. A. (1997). The unit of analysis for situated assessment. Instructional Science, 25, 133-150.
Redman, B. K. & Barab, S. A. (1997). Diabetes education infrastructure and capacity in hospitals and home health agencies in Maryland and Pennsylvania. The Diabetes Educator, 23 (4):449-455.
Barab, S. A., Bowdish, B. E., Young, M. F., & Owen, S. V. (1996). Understanding kiosk navigation: Using log files to capture hypermedia searches. Instructional Science 24(5), 377-395.
Barab, S. A., Fajen, B. R., Kulikowich, J. M., & Young, M. F. (1996). Assessing hypermedia navigation through Pathfinder: Prospects and limitations. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 15(3), 185-205.

BOOKS & BOOK CHAPTERS
Barab, S. A., Dodge, T., Saleh, A., Gentry, E., & Pettyjohn, P. (2012). Uganda’s road to peace may run through the river of forgiveness: Designing playable fictions to teach complex values. In K. Schrier & D. Gibson (eds.) Ethics and game design: Teaching values through play.. (pp. 312-333). IGI Global, Hershey, PA.
Barab, S., Scott, J., Del Valle Martin, R., & Fang, F. (2012). Coming to terms with communities of practice: A definition and operational criteria. In J. Pershing (ed.) Handbook of Human Performance Technology (3rd ed.). (pp. 640-664). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Barab, S. A., Pettyjohn, P., & Gresalfi, M., Solomou, M. (2012). Game-based curricula and the Modern Prometheus design project. In C. Steinkuehler, K. Squire, and S. A. Barab (eds.) Games, Learning, and Society. (pp. 306-326). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
Steinkuehler, C., Squire, K. & Barab, S. A. (eds.) (2012). Games, Learning, and Society. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
Gresalfi, M., & Barab, S. A., Sommerfeld, A. (in press). Intelligent action as a shared accomplishment. To appear in Y. Dai (Ed.), Design research on learning and teaching in educational settings: Enhancing intellectual growth and functioning, LEA, Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum
Barab, S. A., Baek, E., Schatz, S., Scheckler, R., Moore, J. (2009). Illuminating the Braids of Change in a Web-Supported Community: A Design Experiment by Another Name. A. Kelly and D. Lesh (Eds.), Design-Based Research II (pp. 256-289. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
Barab, S., Warren, S., & Ingram-Goble, A. (2008). Conceptual play spaces. In R. Ferdig (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Effective Electronic Gaming in Education (pp. 1-20). Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global publications.
Stuckey, B. & Barab, S. (2007). New conceptions of community design. In R. Andrews & C. Haythornthwaite (Eds.), Handbook of Elearning Research. London, Sage.
Barab, S., Dodge, T., Tuzun, H., Job-Sluder, K., Jackson, C., Arici, A., Job-Sluder, L., Carteaux, R., Jr., Gilbertson, J., & Heiselt, C. (2007). The Quest Atlantis Project: A socially-responsive play space for learning. In B. E. Shelton & D. Wiley (Eds.), The Educational Design and Use of Simulation Computer Games (pp. 159-186). Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers.
Barab, S. A. & Dodge, T. (2007). Strategies for designing embodied curriculum: Building rich contexts for learning. In J. M. Spector, M. D. Merrill, J. J. G. van Merriënboer, & M. P. Driscoll (Eds.). Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (3rd ed.) (pp. 301-348). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Schuh, K., & Barab, S. A. (2007). From philosophy to pedagogy: Exploring relationships. In J. M. Spector, M. D. Merrill, J. J. G. van Merriënboer, & M. P. Driscoll (Eds.). Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology (3rd ed.) (pp. 213-263). Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K., & Hickey, D. (2006). (Eds.). Proceedings of the seventh international conferences of the learning sciences. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Barab, S. A., Jackson, C., Piekarsky, E. (2006). Embedded Professional Development: Learning through Enacting Innovation. In C. Dede, Online professional development for teachers: Emerging models and methods (p. 155-174). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
Barab, S. A. (2006). A methodological toolkit for the learning sciences. In K. Sawyer (ed.) Handbook of the Learning Sciences (pp. 153-170), Cambridge , MA: Cambridge University Press.
Plucker, J., & Barab, S. A. (2005). The Importance of Contexts in Theories of Giftedness: Learning to Embrace the Messy Joys of Subjectivity. In Sternberg, R. & Davidson, J. E. Conceptions of Giftedness (pp. 201-216). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
Barab, S. A., Kling, R., & Gray, J. (2004). (Eds.). Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
Sluder, K., & Barab, S. A. (2004). Sociocultural Analysis Of Online Professional Development: A Case Study Of Personal, Interpersonal, And Community Aspects. Designing for Virtual Communities in the Service of Learning. (pp. 377-403). Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.
Barab, S. A., Evans, M., & Baek, E. (2003). Activity theory as a lens for charactering the participatory unit. In D. Jonassen (Ed.). International Handbook on Communication Technologies, Vol. 2 (pp. 199-214). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
Barab, S. A. (2002). Commentary: Human-field interaction as mediated by mobile computers. To appear in T. Koschmann, R. Hall, & N. Miyake (eds.) Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (pp. 533-538). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
Barab, S. A., & Duffy, T. (2000). From practice fields to communities of practice. In D. Jonassen, & S. M. Land. (Eds.). Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments (pp. 25-56). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Young, M. F., Barab, S. A., & Garrett, S. (2000). Agent as detector: An ecological psychology perspective on learning by perceiving -acting systems. In D. Jonassen, & S. M. Land. (Eds.). Theoretical Foundations of Learning Environments (pp. 147-173). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

COMISSIONSED TALKS
Why Games Should Matter to Educators, Curriculum and Technology, October, 2008.
Games as 21St Century Curriculum, Kenya, August, SPOTLIGHT, 2008.
The Quest Atlantis Project, Serious Games, North Carolina, May, 2008.
Reflexive Play Spaces, Singapore University, March 2007.
Serious Games and Academic Play. Washington, DC. Serious Games Conference. November 2006.
Academic Play Spaces as a 21st Century Pedagogy. University of Madison. Games, Learning, and Society Conference. June 2006.
Academic Play Spaces, Hong Kong University, March 2006.
Embedded Professional Development, Harvard University. August 2005.
Simulations and Games for Learning. Stanford University. July 2005.
The Quest Atlantis Project: A Socially Responsive Play Space for Learning. University of Madison. June 2005.
Conducting Socially-Responsive Design Work. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. June 2004.
Integrating the Web to Support Participatory Learning. Singapore. National Institute of Education. October 2003.
Challenges of Building Online Community. Harvard University, Boston, MA. December 2002.
Technology: Poison or Panacea. Singapore. National Institute of Education. September 2002.
Building Technical Spaces to Support Sociability. Queensland, Australia. Queensland University. August 2002.
Design Based Research: Evolving an Online Community for Learning. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Highly Inter-active Computers in Education. December 2001.
The Inquiry Learning Forum: A New Model for Online Professional Development. Indianapolis, IN. Indiana Humanities Council. October 2001.
Designing Online Communities: What, How, and Why. Georgia Institute of Technology. Athens, GA. Cognitive Science Colloquium Series. November 2001.
The Inquiry Learning Forum: A new Model for Online Professional Development. Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Cognitive Science Colloquium. November 2000.
CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS (Selected Sample)

Barab, S. A. (2012). Videogames and transformational play: Learning in the 21st Century. Keynote presented at the annual meeting of Australian Computers in Education, Perth, AU.
Barab, S. A., & Sewell, B. (2012). Atlantis Remixed: Advancing research into sustainable designs. Paper presented at the annual meeting of Games, Learning and Society, Madison, WI.
Barab, S. A. (2012). Games and impact. Invited presentation at CRESST/UCLA Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Workshop, Los Angeles, CA.
Barab, S. A. (2012). Atlantis Remixed: Learning in virtual worlds. Keynote presented at the annual meeting of GlobalEdCon, Online Presentation.
Barab, S. A., Pettyjohn, P., Saleh, A., Sewell, B., & Haselton, M. (2011). Uganda’s road to peace: Using video games to teach complex values. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
Barab, S. A. (2011). Dramatic agency and transformational play: Facilitating consequential engagement. Keynote presented at the annual meeting of NCSM , Indianapolis, IN.
Barab, S. A. (2012). Videogames and transformational play: Learning in the 21st Century. Distinguish lecture presented at Colorado State University’s ISTEC series, Denver, CO.
Saleh, A., Solomou, M., Siyahhan, S., & Barab, S. A. (2011). Managing the classroom: The effects of teacher strategies on forth graders’ comprehension of genetics. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
Pettyjohn, P., Barab, S. A., & Saleh, A.. (2011). Scaling transformational disruptive technologies. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.
Ingram-Goble, A., & Barab, S. A. (2011). Making game design and programming socially relevant for elementary school children. Paper presented at the annual meeting of Games, Learning and Society, Madison, WI.
Siyahhan, S., & Barab, S. A. (2011).What makes a good game for families? Supporting intergenerational play as a collaborative problem solving activity. Paper presented at the annual meeting of Games, Learning and Society, Madison, WI.
Barab, S. A., Dodge, T., Saleh, A., Pettyjohn, P., Gentry, E., Jameson, E., & Reilly, K. (June, 2010). Playable fictions with metaphorical loft: Using games towards pedagogical ends. Symposium to be presented at Games, Learning, & Society, Madison, WI.
Barab, S. A., Gresalfi, M., Pettyjohn, P., Arici, A., & Ingram-Goble, A. (April, 2010). Transformational play: A design history and its theoretical implications. Symposium to be presented at the American Educational Research Association, Denver, Co.
Barab, S. A., Gresalfi, M., Pettyjohn, P., Solomou, M., & Volk, C. (April, 2010). Transformational play: Meaningfully positioning person, content, and context. Symposium to be presented at the American Educational Research Association, Denver, Co.
Barab, S. A., Gresalfi, M., Arici, A., Pettyjohn, Ingram-Goble., A., & Solomou, M. (May, 2010). Transformational Play: Games as 21st Century Curriculum. To be presented at the International Conferences of the Learning Sciences, Chicago, IL.
Barab, S. A. (October, 2009). Games and science education. Presentation at the National Research Council Meeting. Washington, DC.
Barab, S. A. (September, 2009). Transformational play: Gameplay as consequential play. Presentation at the Digital Media Hub Conference. Chicago, IL.
Barab, S. A., Pettyjohn, P., Volk, C., Peppler, K., Ingram-Goble., A., & Solomou, M. (April, 2009). Pedagogical Dramas and Transformational Play. Presentation at the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.
Barab, S. A., Young, M., Dodge, T., Ingram-Goble, A., Peppler, K., Siyahhan, S., Steinkuehler, C. A., Solomou, M. (April, 2009). Narratizing Formalisms and Formalizing Narratives: Games as 21st-Century Curriculum. Symposium organized at the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.
Barab, S. A., Dodge, T., & Gee, J. P. (April, 2009). The Worked Example: Invitational Scholarship in Service of an Emerging Field. Presentation at the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.
Barab, S. A., (April, 2008). 21St Century Curriculum: Reflexive Play Spaces and the Quest Atlantis Project. Symposium organized at the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY.
Barab, S. A., (April, 2008). New Media Literacies: The MacArthur Digital Media Initiative. Symposium organized at the American Educational Research Association, New York, NY.
Barab, S. A., (April, 2007). Embodied cognition: A more meaningful ontological unit. Symposium organized at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
Barab, S. A., Zuiker, S., Warren, J., Hickey, D. T., Arici, A. D., Kwon, E-J., & Herring, S. (April, 2007). Developing a theory of formalism: Situating socioscientific inquiry for schools. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
Scott, B. M., Ingram-Goble, A., Goldstone, R., Zuiker, S., & Warren, S., & Barab, S. A., (April, 2007). Embodiment as a curricular scaffold for transferable understanding. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
Barab, S. A., (April, 2007). Innovations in Technology Research: From Embedded Phenomena to Embedded Sensing. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
Ingram-Goble, A., Kwon, E-J, & Barab, S. A., (April, 2007). Bot Log Files from Quest Atlantis. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.
Barab, S. A., Sadler, T., Heiselt, C., Hickey, D., Zuiker, S. (April, 2006). Relating Narrative, Inquiry, and Inscriptions: A Framework for Socio-Scientific Inquiry . Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco , CA .
Barab, S. A., (April, 2006). Design-Based Research: A Methodological Toolkit for the Learning Sciences. Symposium organized at the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco , CA .
Barab, S. A., (April, 2006). Developing Methodological Rigor in Design Research in Education. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco , CA .
Barab, S. A., (April, 2006). Design-Based Research: A Methodological Toolkit for the Learning Sciences. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, CA.
Barab, S. A., Warren, S. J., & de-Valle, R. (April, 2005). Coming to Terms with Communities of Practice: A definition and operational criteria. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, CA.
Barab, S. A., Organized and presented at a symposium (2004, April). Design-Based Research: Grounding a New Methodology. This symposium was presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Barab, S. A., & the Socially-Responsive Design Group. (2004, April). Creating a Socially-Responsive Play Space for Learning: Something for Boys and Girls. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Barab, S. A., Organized and presented at a symposium (2003, April). Empowerment Design Work: Building Participant Structures that Transform. This symposium was presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , IL .
Barab, S. A., Baek, E., Schatz, S., Scheckler, R., Moore, J., & Sluder, K. (2003, April). Illuminating the Braids of Change in a Web-Supported Community: A Design Experiment by Any Other Name. Presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , IL .
Barab, S. A. (2003, April). Using Design to Advance Learning Theory or Using Learning Theory to Advance Design. Presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , IL .
Scheckler, R., & Barab, S. A. (2003, April). Teachers adopting Inquiry: Three axes of tension. Presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , IL .
Job-Sluder, K., & Barab, S. A. (2003, April). Indicators of Shared Group Identity. Presented at the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , IL .
Organized and presented at a symposium. (2003, April). Designing in the Service of Online Communities. This symposium was presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal , CA .
Barab, S. A., Schatz, S., & Scheckler, R. (2002, April). Using Activity Theory to Conceptualize Online Community and Using Online Community to Conceptualize Activity Theory. Presented at the annual meeting of the Mind Culture and Activity Conference, Copenhagen , Denmark .
Barab, S., Thomas, M., Dodge, T., Goodrich, T., Carteaux, B., Tuzun, H. (2002). Empowerment design work: Building participant structures that transform. Presented at the International Conference of the Learning Sciences , Seattle , WA , 232-236.
Barab, S. A., Scheckler, R. & MaKinster, J. (2001, April). Designing System Dualities: Building Online Community. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Seattle , WA .
Barab, S. A., & Schatz, S. (2001, April). Using Activity Theory to Conceptualize Online Community and Using Online Community to Conceptualize Activity Theory. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Seattle , WA .
Squire K., MaKinster J., Barnett, M., & Barab S. A. (2001, April). Paper presented as part of the Building Sustainable Science Curriculum: Acknowledging and Accommodating Local Adaptation Symposium at the annual meeting of the American Education Research Association, Seattle , WA .
Barab, S., Kelly, C., Barnett, M., Squire, K., & MaKinster, J. (2001, April). Paper presented as part of the Using Online Modeling Tools to Support Knowing-in-the-Making Symposium at the annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, St. Louis , MO.
Barab, S. A., & Hay, K. (2000, April). Doing Science at the Elbows of Scientists: Issues Related to the Scientist Apprentice Camp. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans , LA.
Barab, S. A., Moore, J. A., Cunningham, D., & the ILF Design Team (2000, April). The Internet Learning Forum: Fostering And Sustaining Knowledge Networking To Support and Research A Community Of Science And Mathematics Teachers. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans , LA.
Barab, S. A., Barnett, M., Yamagata-Lynch, L., Squire, K., Keating, T. (1999, May). Using activity theory to understand the contradictions characterizing a technology-rich introductory astronomy course. Presented at the 1999 Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal , CA .
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., & Barnett, M. G., (1999, April). A Vision for Learning Astronomy. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal , CA .
Barab, S. A., Squire, K., & Dueber, B. (1999, May). Supporting Authenticity through Participatory Learning. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Keating, T., Barnett. M., & Barab, S. A. (1999). Student Learning Through Building Virtual Models. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal , CA .
Barab, S. A. (1999, May). Chair of session on Researching Cognition in Situ: Toward a Consensus on Assumptions and Methods. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.
Barab, S. A., Hay, K. E., Barnett, M. G., & Squire, K. (1998, May). Constructing Knowledge and Virtual Worlds: Knowledge Diffusion in Future Camp 97. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Barab, S. A., Cherkes-Julkowski, M., Swenson, R., Garrett. S., & Shaw, R. E. (1998, May). Principles of self-organization: Ecologizing the learner-facilitator system. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Barab, S. A., & Young, M. F. (1998, May). Examining the Products and Process of Learning from Linear, Navigational, and Generative Computerized Texts: Differences Between Problem Solving and Reading Comprehension Goals. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Hay, K. E. & Barab, S. A. (1998, May). Building Worlds: Tools of Virtual Practice. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego , CA .
Hay, K. E. & Barab, S. A. (1998, May). Electronic Performance Support System: Supporting Science Apprenticeships. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Diego, CA.
oung, M. F., Barab, S. A., & Kulikowich, J. M. (1997, July). The unit of analysis for situated assessment. Presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for Ecological Psychology, Toronto , Canada .
Barab, S. A., Bowdish, B. E., & Lawless, K. (1997, May). Capturing and interpreting hypermedia navigation. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago , Ill.
Young, M. F, Barab, S. A., & Fajen, B. R. (1996, May). Dynamics of intentions in dribble files. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, NY , NY .
Barab, S. A., Young, M. F., Garret, S., & Fajen, B. R. (1995, October). Dribble files: Providing educators with a means of seamless, non-intrusive assessment. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Educational Research Association, Ellenville , NY .
Barab, S. A., Bowdish, B. E., Lawless, K., & Young, M. F. (1995, June). Intentional dynamics: The role of intentions in constraining a kiosk search. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychological Association, NY , NY .
Barab, S. A. (1995, June). Using technology to individualize instruction. Paper presented at the Connecticut Special Education Conference, Cromwell , CT.
Willet, W., & Barab, S. A. (1995, April). City planning and urban development for Kids: A computer augmented hands-on simulation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the New England Educational Research Organization, Newport , NH .